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More Nutrient Rich Blood To Your Muscles With No Additional Cardiac Demand
Because of its impressive ability to dilate human blood vessels in a way that allows for significant increases in blood and thus nutrient and oxygen flow to the musculature and other organs, nitric oxide (NO) has long been thought of exclusively as a “pump” supplement.
  • A closer look at the research, however, reveals that it would be shortsighted to think of NO boosters like our very own “Nitric Oxide Booster” Patch as mere “pump supplements”. After all, nitric oxide is an essential signaling molecule with health effects that go way beyond the provision of insane pumps at the gym:
    • The blood vessel dilating nitric oxide isNO and your cardiovascular health: Nitric oxide helps you maintain and achieve normal blood pressure levels. Eventually, even the detrimental effects of smoking are partly mediated via the smoking-impaired reduction of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis (Barua. 2001).

    Optimal NO levels will thus protect you from all the potentially fatal secondary diseases (heart disease, stroke, etc.) that have been associated with chronic hypertension (Haynes. 1993; Stamler. 1994).

    • NO and your immune system: Despite the fact that “today, there is no simple, uniform picture of the function of NO in the immune system” (Bogdan. 2001). There’s no doubt about the important role of nitric oxide in the maintenance and function of our immune system. It’s after all nitric oxide that’s used by our body’s pathogen police, the white blood cells, to attack viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, helminths, and even tumor cells (MacMicking. 1997).
    • NO and your metabolic health: Next to the previously discussed health effects, nitric oxide has also been identified as an important regulator of glucose control. In this regard, NO’s ability to increase glucose transport in skeletal muscle (Balon. 1997) is particularly intriguing and could be great interest to both, athletes and sedentary, often overweight individuals (Bogdanski. 2012).

    Some scientists even go so far as to speculate that the natural increase in NO production that occurs with acute and chronic training (Jungersten. 1997) may be partly responsible for the well-known exercise-induced improvements of blood glucose management. The impaired NO production in diabetics, on the other hand, is part of the vicious cycle that makes it so difficult for diabetics to Arginine supplementation leads to significant normalize their glucose levels and lose weight.

    • NO and your brain / CNS health: Without nitric oxide our brains’ neurotransmitters system cannot function properly. Studies that used an NO-synthase inhibitor, which prevents the local conversion of precursor molecules as you can find them in our “Nitrix Oxide Booster” Patch to nitric oxide, found that a lack of nitric oxide production inhibits the release of neurotransmitters like serotonin, which makes you happy, and dopamine, which gets you going (Garthwaite. 1991; Yun. 1997). Needless to say that this may have far-reaching negative effects on how you feel and behave.

    Nitric oxide is also heavily involved in the differentiation and regeneration of cells of our nervous system; and even though “the precise functions of NO in developing and regenerating neurons remain unclear” (Bredt. 1994), scientists know for sure that reduced nitric oxide levels as they occur with aging, diabetes and several other common ailments promote the progression of cognitive decline.

    • NO and your sexual function: It stands a nitric oxide mediated increase in vasodilation can have profound beneficial effects on male sexual function (Burnett. 1992; Toda. 2005). It’s thus not surprising that herbs and foods that improve the availability of nitric oxide have been used as ‘natural Viagra’ for centuries (Cormio. 2011; Bryan. 2015). Diabetes or smoking, on the other hand, mediate their ill effects on erectile function in men at least partly by their detrimental effect on penile nitric oxide synthase (Xie. 1997; Liu. 2015).

    Men are yet not the only ones whose sexual function critically depends on the presence of sufficient levels of nitric oxide and its influence on the previously discussed production of serotonin and dopamine, as well as its direct impact on the production of fertility hormones via the NO-induced release of the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone aka “LHRH” (Mani. 1994).

    • NO and your athletic performance: While the best-known effect of Nitric Oxide supplements within the fitness community is, as previously pointed out, their ability to increase “the pump”, the athletic / performance effects of powerful nitric oxide boosters like our “Nitric Oxide Booster” Patch go well beyond improvements of the way you look and feel during your workouts.

    The reformulated nitric oxide patch feeds into both pathways, the arginine NO pathway (classic) and the nitrate NO pathway to maximally boost your NO levels.

    Figure 3: The reformulated nitric oxide patch feeds into both pathways, the arginine
    NO pathway (classic) and the nitrate NO pathway to maximally boost your NO levels.

    By feeding directly and without first-pass in the liver into the “arginine > nitric oxide”- and the “nitrate > nitric oxide”-pathways, the reformulated “Nitric Oxide Booster” Patch induces significantly more pronounced increases in NO production than any of the first generation arginine-only products you may have tried.

    10-km time-trial performance of 10 trained cyclists with (A) individual data and (B) mean power output after 6 days on either nitrate or placebo supplement

    Figure 4: 10-km time-trial performance of 10 trained cyclists with (A) individual data and
    (B) mean power output after 6 days on either nitrate or placebo supplement (Cermak. 2012).

    The corresponding increases in nitric oxide production are profound enough to trigger increases in performance not just in sedentary and moderately trained individuals (cf. Besco. 2012), but also in highly trained individuals whose NO production is naturally elevated (Jungersten. 1997; Cermak. 2012 | cf. Figure 4).